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The Microprocessor at 50

Jack Ganssle - Watch Now - Duration: 35:40

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the invention of the microprocessor. It’s hard to imagine a world without this device! Yet the story goes back long before 1971. In this session Jack gives the history of electronics from the early days to today, with special focus on computers.
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Joffrey
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | 1 reply

That reminds me, I haven't received any Gansssle embedded newsletter for a long time now... is it just me?

MatthewEshleman
Score: 0 | 4 months ago | no reply

FWIW: I get them regularly and recently.

DS
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | no reply

As a long-time follower of your work, I greatly enjoyed your presentation. I feel like we are so often caught up in the daily struggles to produce/create/manage, that it is easy to lose sight of the big picture. You do a wonderful job of bringing the wonders of that big picture into focus. An appreciation of how we got here is crucial to appreciating where we are.

malreverse
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | 1 reply

I find it interesting how history repeats itself. We have tera and petabytes of information and/or storage. Yet, today, I feel I see more and more where we try to reduce the code due to security and speed. Your thoughts?

JackGanssleSpeaker
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | 1 reply

Data is growing exponentially; code isn't as we have limited bandwidth from our brains to the IDE. Security means, in part, having code that is tractable yet packages like Windows are enormous... with lots of vulnerabilities. "They" want more functionality but are unwilling to pay for security. This has to change.

malreverse
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | no reply

TRUTH. Then, they scream when they are breached and have 100 phone apps of which they use 1%. Same with computers. How many unnecessary apps are on them that we don't use and they come with?

meenal_b
Score: 1 | 1 year ago | 1 reply

Hi Jack, thanks for the talk. I asked this on the Q&A but Jacob didn't get to it. What do you think about the sheer electronic waste that the consumer electronics industry generates? How do you think we can make technology a force for good in the world? -- from an idealistic young engineer

JackGanssleSpeaker
Score: 1 | 1 year ago | no reply

I'm not optimistic. The 2nd law of thermodynamics works against us - it's just too costly to recover much of this material. When we toss our phones every couple of years we do a disservice to the environment. And manufacturing this stuff is dirty - TSMC uses gobs of water yet Taiwan is having a water crisis.

malreverse
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | no reply

Can you provide a list of the websites you study and books to buy? Thank you.

BobS-Cleveland
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | no reply

A very interesting and well considered walk down history lane. (some of which I experienced first hand as well). Thank you for a great presentation.
Bob in Cleveland, OH

WD
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | no reply

This was truly an amazing journey, your storytelling, research and humor throughout the presentation made it a very pleasant experience. Thank you!!

MatthewZaleski
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | no reply

Jack,

I always enjoy listening to you (or reading) on any topic you cover. Your wealth of knowledge and expertise shines through every time. This one was no different; Great presentation!

EbeamBobD
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | 1 reply

I still have a pair of 8" floppy drives I bought there in the late 70s... sitting in the closet in this room.

JackGanssleSpeaker
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | 1 reply

8" floppies! I bet you could store hours of HD video on them... or something!

EbeamBobD
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | 2 replies

IIRC, the capacity (in CP/M) was <256kbytes.

JackGanssleSpeaker
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | 1 reply

As I recall NEC came out with the 765, one of the first floppy controllers. It was a bear to use and the datasheet was wildly inaccurate.

EbeamBobD
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | no reply

My Tarbell S-100 FDC board uses the WD 1771; also a very early LSI implementation.

JackGanssleSpeaker
Score: 1 | 1 year ago | no reply

I think the single density ones were 80 KB, at least when they first came out.

DaveN
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | 1 reply

Would that surplus store have been Eli Hefron's ? From another antique nerd...

JackGanssleSpeaker
Score: 0 | 1 year ago | no reply

Could be - it was so long ago I don't remember!

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